Frequent question: Where do you feel kicks if baby is back to back?

Where do you feel movement if baby is back-to-back?

Your baby’s bum will feel squashier than their head, which will be firm and round. If your baby is lying back-to-back (OP position), your bump might feel squashy and you may feel (and see) kicks in the middle of your belly. Another sign of the OP position is a dip around your belly button instead of it poking out.

Where do you feel kicks if baby is posterior?

Posterior position (head down, with his back against your back). This position usually means you’ll feel kicks right at the front of your tummy, generally around the middle. You may also notice that your tummy looks as though it’s flattened out, rather than being a rounded shape.

What does it mean when baby is back-to-back during Labour?

A back-to-back position is where your baby has their head down, but the back of their head and back is against your spine. By the time labour starts, at least one baby in 10 is in this posterior position. Most back-to-back babies are born vaginally.

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How long is too long not feeling baby move?

A: The short answer to your question is no, it is not normal to go three days without feeling movement. The long answer is as follows: fetal movement is usually felt by first time moms between 18 and 22 weeks, and in second time moms even earlier, sometimes as early as 14 or 16 weeks.

Is it normal to feel baby move on both sides?

Head-down babies will kick more strongly on one side and towards the top of the bump. Later on, some babies with their head at the bottom like to stretch their legs every so often and this can feel like something is sticking out on both sides of your bump – one side will be the bottom, the other side will be the feet.

Is posterior baby more painful?

Some research suggests that it’s because the epidural relaxes mom’s pelvic muscles, which in turn keeps the baby from rotating out of the OP position. Some argue that having a posterior baby (and often a longer and possibly more painful labor) makes it more likely for a woman to request an epidural.

Is it harder to deliver a posterior baby?

The sunny side up, or posterior position, puts baby’s head where it is more likely to get wedged against the pubic bone. When this happens, pressure is placed on your spine and sacrum and can cause a longer and more painful delivery.

What are the risks of having babies back to back?

Back-to-back pregnancies can deplete essential nutrients, making mothers at higher risk for anemia and other complications such as uterine rupture, and also putting their babies at risk of low birth weight and preterm birth.

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Is a back to back birth more painful?

Back labor vs.

Normal labor contractions feel like intense menstrual cramps that come and go with increasing intensity. Regular contractions are only slightly felt in the back. Back labor is much more intense pain in your lower back.

Does back to back Labor take longer?

Sometimes a baby in a back to back position takes longer to navigate the pelvis, meaning the ‘pushing’ or second stage of labour can also be extended. It can also mean that you feel a lot of the sensation in your back itself rather than your bump, and is sometimes why it’s referred to as a ‘back labour’.

Why does my baby stay on one side of my stomach?

While this is a common occurrence in pregnancy, it is not normal. Also, babies often sleep where they are not squished. So if you’re always on your left side then babies will spend more time on the right.

Why do I feel my baby moving in my pelvic area?

Because the upper uterine wall is still growing, your baby might wiggle around in the lower pelvic area and eventually make his or her way up. Keep in mind that your baby still has a lot of wiggle room, and the location of the kicking is likely to change within days if not hours.

Do you feel pain when the baby is turning?

Yes, many women experience some pain or discomfort when their baby moves. If it only happens when your baby’s moving, it’s unlikely to be a sign that anything is wrong. If the pain doesn’t go away when your baby stops moving, if it’s severe, or if you have any other symptoms, call your GP or midwife straight away.

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