Frequent question: Why can’t babies have cough medicine?

Can I give my infant cough medicine?

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that children under the age of two should never be given over-the-counter (OTC) cough or cold medications. However, most cough and cold products state that cough and cold medicine should not be given to children under the age of four.

When can kids have cough medicine?

Don’t use over-the-counter medicines, except for fever reducers and pain relievers, to treat coughs and colds in children younger than 6 years old. Also, consider avoiding use of these medicines for children younger than 12 years old.

Can you give 6 month old cough medicine?

Cough syrups should not be given to a baby or child under 2 years of age. Even the ones designed especially for children should not be given to a baby unless they are recommended by a doctor.

What are RSV symptoms in babies?

What are the symptoms of RSV in a child?

  • Runny nose.
  • Fever.
  • Cough.
  • Short periods without breathing (apnea)
  • Trouble eating, drinking, or swallowing.
  • Wheezing.
  • Flaring of the nostrils or straining of the chest or stomach while breathing.
  • Breathing faster than usual, or trouble breathing.

Is there a decongestant for babies?

Children’s Dimetapp Decongestant Infant drops are used for:

Relieving congestion due to colds, flu, and allergies. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor. Children’s Dimetapp Decongestant Infant drops are a decongestant.

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What medicine can you give a 6 month old for cold?

The FDA advises against using them at all in children younger than 4. To bring down a fever and make your child more comfortable, you can use acetaminophen (Children’s Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Children’s Motrin or Advil) if they’re over 6 months old.