What spices can I add to homemade baby food?

What seasonings can you add to baby food?

Spices such as cinnamon, saffron, cardamom and clove, which are easy to add to fruit sauces and oatmeal. Savory spices, such as basil, coriander, cumin and turmeric pair well with vegetables and add depth and simple yumminess to your little one’s first bites.

Should you add seasoning baby food?

Baby food doesn’t have to be bland – in fact, spices and seasonings are encouraged. The more variety, the better, to expand your baby’s tastes. You don’t have to make separate food for your baby – little ones can eat what the rest of the family is eating, as long it doesn’t contain added sugars.

What spices can a 6 month old eat?

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Devje says any mild spice like coriander, mild curry powder, nutmeg, turmeric, black pepper, cumin, fennel, dill, oregano, and thyme are all OK to introduce to your child’s diet after six months.

How can I make my baby tasty without salt?

Use Foods that Are Naturally ‘Salty’

There are some fab foods out there that have a naturally ‘salty’ taste – which pack a punch for flavour, without adding any unnecessary sodium. These include: eggs, beetroot, chard, celery, artichoke, arugula and lemon. And all are safe for babies age 6 months and older!

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Can you put butter in baby food?

If your infant will not eat these foods alone, you may mix them with other foods that your baby likes. Add one teaspoon of butter, margarine or vegetable oil to every 4 ounces of fruits, vegetables, iron-fortified baby cereals, or meats.

Is garlic powder OK for babies?

Aromatic ones — such as cinnamon, nutmeg, garlic, turmeric, ginger, coriander, dill and cumin — are perfectly fine to introduce to children, even in infancy after 6 months. When introducing solid food, one should go ahead and try especially the aromatic foods.

Can you season baby food with salt?

Adding too much salt to a baby’s food can be harmful to his immature kidneys, which might not be able to process the excess salt. Salting baby foods also can also lead to a lifelong preference for salty foods, and that can endanger a child’s future health.